I think I’m a clone now

Dr. Tom Phillips worked on a CREATe project with me, as a research associate (Dr. Keith M. Johnston was the co-investigator).  Our project on Games and Transmedia dealt with a wide range of issue pertaining to law, business and these emerging creative industries – including art/business tensions, formal and informal regulation, and how risk and disputes are handled. One point that we kept coming to, from a range of starting points, was the tricky and often emotive subject of ‘cloning’ in the games industry. I had a few paragraphs on this in my article last year, but the real outcomes of these discussions can be found in Tom’s article, published as open access today (free for anyone to download) in the journal Cultural Trends.

In “Don’t clone my indie game, bro”: Informal cultures of videogame regulation in the independent sector (click to read/download), Tom reports on the history of cloning as an issue, informed by events and conversations in the games world, and academic and legal developments. The article also gives a great insight into discussions we had with a fascinating group of developers and others in December 2013, as part of the project. Tom has made use of many of the key points from those discussions, to try and provide a greater understanding of how the rights and wrongs of cloning are discussed within the industry (or industries). He concludes by wondering whether we have reached a position where further legal interest is inevitable.

Do read the article – and I address this in particular to legal readers of the blog, because Tom’s take on how law affects the development of and conversations within a fast-moving industry is worthy of your consideration.

Abstract:

In the contemporary games sector, independent developers feel there is an inadequate level of protection for their intellectual property, particularly with regards to game clones. There is also a sense that neither players nor policy-makers completely understand the specificities of how IP may be creatively, if not legally infringed. As a result, there has increasingly been a shift towards the construction of a culture of self-regulation for indie developers, attempting to publicly shame cloners via social media, directly impacting infringers’ reputation and sales and bypassing formal regulation.This article uses interviews and workshop discussions with developers to examine the manner in which this informal culture of regulation has been perpetuated in relation to current videogame copyright legislation, and suggests how the interrelation between producers and policy-makers may help to inform the direction of future policy decisions. Examining the way appropriate practice is informally managed in independent gaming, the article considers the soundness of policy in the contemporary videogames industry.

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