Artificial intelligence, competition – Monday plugging

(1) Supported by CREATe, here’s a fascinating workshop on artificial intelligence and the law, organised by my Edinburgh colleague Prof. Burkhard Schafer:

Ever since Larry Lessig’s proposal to understand “Digital Rights Management” as a form of regulation through code, the field of copyright in the digital economy has opened up a new field of research questions for Artificial Intelligence and Law. How can we represent in more intelligent and semantically richer ways legal concepts that ensure that all, and only, lawful use can be made of digital objects such as film clips or music tunes? How can Information Retrieval support e-discovery in IP litigation? How can we support through technology creators and digital businesses to manage their IP rights, or to use third party material in a law-compliant way? These are just a few of the questions that offer new and exciting applications for artificial intelligence in a legal context.

The call for papers closes this week, so do get in touch; the workshop itself is in December.  All of the details are available here.

(2) My former colleagues at the ESRC Centre for Competition Policy have a good opportunity for someone about to complete a PhD or with one recently in the bag – a one-year postdoctoral fellowship at a leading interdisciplinary centre (law, economics, business, political science) for academic research on competition and regulation.  Even for someone who only scraped the surface of CCP issues during my time there, it was a very vibrant, provocative group to work with – and if your interests are within the Centre’s research programme, it would be a pretty great chance to immerse yourself in relevant academic activity:

The Centre is a focus of research into Competition and Regulation across a range of disciplines, and welcomes applications in the area of competition or regulation policy from candidates with a strong background in competition law, industrial economics, or Political Science related to competition policy or regulation. Post doctoral fellows are expected to contribute to the Centre’s research individually and to develop joint research with other Centre members.

 

CREATe RAs at Edinburgh Law School

All information and online application available here.  Project 2 is led by me (and includes Dr. Keith M. Johnston, University of East Anglia), and I welcome informal queries at daithi.mac.sithigh@ed.ac.uk .  For the other projects, contact Smita Kheria (1) and Burkhard Schafer (3).  Now, the job ad:

The University of Edinburgh is a partner in the consortium of universities running CREATe and we are seeking three fixed-term, part-time research assistants to contribute to a CREATe Project. All applicants for these posts will be based in the Edinburgh Law School.  Salary: £25,251 – £29,249 (pro rata); see below for the duration and weekly commitment of each post.
Project 1 – Applications are invited for a part-time Research Assistant to contribute to a two year project on copyright and individual creators. The successful applicant will have a Masters degree in Law or Socio-legal studies or a relevant social science discipline (e.g. sociology or science and technology studies), ideally will be completing a PhD or have a PhD, and have expertise in socio-legal empirical research and/or qualitative and quantitative methods and research design. This part-time post (1 day per week) is available on a fixed term basis for two years from January 2013. 

Project 2 – Applications are invited for a part-time Research Assistant to contribute to a one-year project on video games and transmedia. The successful applicant will have a Masters degree in Law (or a relevant other discipline, with the applicant having some understanding of law/regulation), ideally will be completing a PhD or have a PhD, and have strong knowledge (through study, professional experience, creative practice or personal interest) of the relevant industries, particularly games. This part-time post (1 day per week) is available on a fixed term basis for one year from January 2013. 

Project 3 – Applications are invited for a part-time Research Assistant to contribute to a two-year project on the future of DRM. The successful applicant will have a Masters degree either in Law or Informatics (or a relevant other discipline, with the applicant having some understanding of law/regulation), ideally s/he will be completing a PhD or have a PhD, and have strong knowledge of the regulatory issues of software technologies.


Researcher wanted!

I am one of the researchers in the Centre for Creativity, Regulation, Enterprise and Technology (CREATe), funded by the AHRC, ESRC and EPSRC for the next four years.  It’s led by the University of Glasgow and both my former institution (UEA) and current (Edinburgh) are participating institutions.

As such, I’m very pleased to say that, for a project being run by myself and my former UEA colleague Dr. Emily Laidlaw, we are now looking for someone to work with us, a day a week for two years (to be appointed by UEA):

We are seeking a part time Senior Research Associate to contribute to a two phase CREATe project on human rights and the public interest in the context of copyright and the digital economy, in collaboration with the University of Edinburgh.

You will have a Masters degree in Law or a related field and have expertise in human rights, copyright and/or information technology law and be able to fulfil the essential criteria in the person specification. This is a part time post for 1 day per week (20%) on a fixed term basis for two years.

And what’s it about?

We are seeking a Senior Research Associate to contribute to a CREATe project on human rights and the public interest in the context of copyright and the digital economy. This is a two phase project. The first phase consists of a comparative literature review to analyse the relationship between freedom of expression and copyright. The second phase seeks to identify trends in human rights engagement (past, present and future) and to identify the impact differing business models have on human rights. The goal from this investigation is to identify the key human rights issues raised by current and emerging business frameworks in the creative industry and provide guidance on how freedom of expression can facilitate new business models.

Closing date 12th October.  All the details are here.